KWeather

 

    JM Social Icons

    Breadcrumbs

    High Yield

     

    Dr. Agnes Kalibata, President, AGRA(1).jpg

    Dr. Agnes Kalibata, President, Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa (AGRA)

    By Dr. Agnes Kalibata, President, AGRA

    As the world’s population surges towards 9 billion by mid-century, food production has failed to keep pace, creating rising food shortages and a global food crisis ahead, according to the United Nations. To avoid mass starvation, the world needs to produce 70 per cent more food by 2050.

    The greatest potential to deliver that growth exists in Africa. The African continent is home to 25 per cent of the world’s agricultural land. Yet it produces just 10 per cent of the world’s food. That compares with China, which has just 10 per cent of the world’s agricultural land, but produces 20 per cent of the global food supply.

    If Africa can now rise to the challenge of upgrading its agricultural output, it will open the way to a takeoff in GDP, greater youth employment, and the potential of positive trade balances and rising currencies.

    Yet, the continent faces two profound issues in delivering its own agricultural turnaround, with its agricultural industry both rural and fragmented, and built upon smallholder farmers. It is the continent’s rural areas that have been most deprived of resources and investment: with the straight-line consequence that the continent’s core industry continues to under-perform, and under-perform badly.

    The allure of city living has left rural areas neglected and strained Africa’s urban infrastructure and services, including health, water and sanitation, creating rising social problems and competition for city space. Indeed, Africa is now the fastest urbanizing continent in the world, with 60 per cent of all Africans forecast to be living in cities by 2050, according to UN Habitat.

    But urban areas are dependent on rural populations for food. Moreover, agriculture holds more power in creating youth employment than any other sector, at a time when 10 million youth are entering the labor market each year in Africa, according to the 2015 Africa Agriculture Status Report (AASR).

     

     

    cabbage red By Laban Robert.JPG

    Red cabbage farming in Kenya

    In late April this year, at the G20 Conference in Germany, panelists at the ONE World no hunger meeting powerfully demonstrated the importance of attracting youth to the agricultural sector.

    Rural youth are the future of the sector, with the capacity for innovation and entrepreneurship. Yet their participation has been hindered by the perception that the sector is unattractive due to risks, costs, low-profitability and agriculture’s labor intensive nature.

    Additionally, rural youth have limited access to educational programs that provide agricultural skills, often limited access to land, and a lack of financial services tailored to their needs, as well as poor infrastructure and utilities.

    The outcome of the ONE World no hunger meeting was the Berlin Charter, which seeks to create opportunities for the younger generation and women in the rural world by mapping out a model for rural development to achieve food security, long-term jobs and improved livelihoods.

    It calls on governments to put in place agricultural, nutrition and anti-poverty policies to “lift at least 600 million people out of hunger and undernutrition” and “cut youth underemployment at least by half” by 2025. The Charter with a core focus on smallholder farmers, was presented to the G20 leaders at their meeting in July 2017 in Hamburg.

     Agriculture accounts for 32 per cent of Africa’s GDP and employs more than 60 per cent of the continent’s total labor force. But in order to realize its full potential, the political and economic environment needs to be conducive for smallholder farmers, who make up 70 per cent of the sub-Saharan Africa population. With smallholder output hampered by insecurity of land tenure and unequal access to land, land policy formulation and reforms are critical in Africa to in order to boost agricultural production. Rwanda has provided a benchmark in this, with over 10 million land parcels now titled and owned individually.

    Other problems smallholder farmers face include limited access to markets, finance, high-yielding seeds, farm inputs and mechanization, which, invariably, lead to low levels of productivity. External shocks such as climate change have further hampered agricultural production.

     African countries urgently need to support smallholder farmers in order to capture the continent’s $300bn food market - projected to be worth US $1 trillion by 2030. At present, only five per cent of Africa’s imported cereals come from other African countries, with intra-African trade running consistently at around 15 per cent of Africa’s total trade – which is amongst the lowest intra-regional trade levels in the world (UNECA). In fact, African governments have stepped-up efforts to transform agriculture over the last decade, delivering often exceptional results.

    READ ALSO: East African farmers turn tonnes of banana wastes to briquettes, saving forests

    READ ALSO: African farmers fix sick soils planting legumes

    READ ALSO: UK charity to buy cows for poor African farmers

    Ethiopia, for instance, has invested in extension workers, rural roads and modern market-building enabling cereal production to increase and increasing the number of calories its rural people consume by roughly 50 per cent. As a result, Ethiopia is now reducing poverty at the rate of four per cent a year (ONE.org, 2014).

    Burkina Faso, a landlocked country, has also made remarkable progress in poverty reduction and food security with government investment in the sector averaging 17 per cent of total expenditure for the past 10 years (ONE.org, 2014). Ghana’s agricultural transformation agenda has, likewise, remained a top priority for successive governments, spurring reforms and heavy investment.

    Yet as these early investments now move these particular economies up the growth ladder, other African governments have been slower to prioritize agriculture, despite the demonstrable financial gains and growing consequences in protest on food shortages.

    As the G20 now reviews its strongest commitment yet to African agriculture and rural development, African governments and investors, likewise, need to heed the clarion call to action, and move agricultural reform and smallholders to the center of the continent’s political and economic debate.

    Write comment (0 Comments)

           Dr. Kanayo Nwanze.jpg

          Dr. Kanayo Nwanze

    Opinion
    As I settle back in my homeland Nigeria since retiring as the President of the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) in March this year, I am reminded of a local saying that when you go to the stream to fetch water, your bucket will only be filled with the water that is yours. No one can take the water that is meant for you. Life will give you what you deserve, nothing more, and nothing less. But first you must walk to the stream, bend down, and dip your bucket.


    This parable inspired the title of my recently released book, A Bucket of Water, that distils lessons and experiences from my 40-year professional career dedicated to agriculture in general, and African agriculture in particular.
    I have witnessed many inspiring changes in Africa over the years. Technologies that enable farmers produce more yield per unit acreage have been developed. Access to markets and financial resources have also improved as has the policy landscape. Additionally, Africa is experiencing unprecedented economic growth with five of the world’s 10 fastest growing economies being African.


    However, this progress is ironical when Africa, rich as it is, is still unable to feed itself - poverty levels remain high and millions go to bed hungry. I see our over-dependence on minerals as the main problem.


    According to the US Geological Survey 2016, Sub- Saharan Africa produces 77 per cent of the world’s platinum metals; 60 per cent of its cobalt (used for batteries and metal alloys); 46 per cent of its natural industrial diamonds; and an abundance of gold, uranium, oil, and gas. Tragically, this immense mineral richness has not benefited the majority
    My vision for Africa’s future is not built on a foundation of extractive industries. These riches have not translated into wide-ranging job creation, or social welfare and stability. They have not fed hungry people. They have not reduced poverty.


    I see Africa’s economic growth predicated upon unlocking and fully tapping into the potential of smallholder farmers who make up 70 per cent of our population. When I insisted for many years that small-scale farms were as much businesses as large-scale operations, my views were considered at best romantic and at worst foolish. I am glad to note that the concept of smallholder farms as a business has become commonplace today.


    Achieving the kind of economic growth that leaves no one behind requires deliberate prioritization of the agricultural sector. In fact, agriculture is the surest path to Africa’s prosperity. For instance, it is well established that GDP growth due to agriculture is at least three times more effective in reducing poverty in resource-poor, low-income countries than growth in other sectors. In sub-Saharan Africa, it is estimated to be 11 times more effective.

    We are richly endowed with what it takes to achieve greatness - ideal climatic conditions which are, unfortunately, changing in devastating ways; large swathes of arable land; huge deposits of water that can be used for irrigation; and, most importantly, the vast potential of the people themselves especially the ingenuity and vigour of our youth. Our women who do most of our farming deserve a special mention. In 2016, I was honoured as the winner of the Inaugural Africa Food Prize which I dedicated to the millions of African women who silently toil to feed their families. I am a strong believer that no nation has been able to transform itself without giving women the same rights and opportunities as men.


    However, as I have said many times before, achieving a continent-wide agricultural transformation, as the foundation for food security and poverty alleviation, requires visionary national and continental leadership. For our continent has all it needs to succeed in the right climate of leadership.


    We laud our leaders’ commitment to allocate at least 10 per cent of public expenditure to agriculture, and to ensuring its efficiency and effectiveness, in the Malabo Declaration. A lot more still needs to be done. For instance, only eight out of 44 governments in sub-Saharan Africa have kept these promises to invest more in agriculture.


    However, where the resolution has been adopted, and the will is there; where the decisions have been taken, and the actions implemented; the results have been both swift and phenomenal.


    Ethiopia, for example, has reaped huge benefits for the last two decades from visionary leadership and by honouring its development commitments. The government set up the Growth and Transformation Plan (GTP) to bolster smallholder farmers’ productivity, enhance marketing systems, upgrade the participation of the private sector, increase the volume of irrigated land and curtail the number of households with inadequate food.


    Today, agriculture is Ethiopia's most important sector, accounting for nearly half of the country’s GDP (46.3 per cent), 90 per cent of exports and 85 per cent of the labour force.


    Rwanda is another example where agricultural transformation has spanned land reform, land consolidation, and better access to inputs and extension for smallholders. This has increased the country’s food availability by 150 per cent, reducing chronic malnutrition and stunting significantly, and reducing poverty by 20 per cent in the last 10 years.


    Visionary leadership in agriculture, therefore, demonstrably offers rapid returns. Ethiopia and Rwanda, both among the fastest growing African economies, are good examples of countries that have walked to the stream to fill their buckets.
    Other countries should make the same walk to the river of agricultural opportunities that continues flowing.

    The landmark African Green Revolution Forum to be hosted in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire by H.E. President Alassane Ouattara, is one step towards the river. At the Forum, global and African leaders will develop actionable plans that will move African agriculture forward.

      Kanayo pic 3.jpg

    Dr. Kanayo F. Nwanze is the 2016 winner of the Africa Food Prize and the immediate Former President of the International Fund for agricultural Development (IFAD). He is also a Board Member of the Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa (AGRA).

    Write comment (0 Comments)

    wefarm.pngheifer international.png

    WeFarm, the world’s largest farmer-to-farmer knowledge sharing network, today announced that it has partnered with Heifer International, a nonprofit working to end hunger and poverty with sustainable agriculture and entrepreneurship, to bring the benefits of WeFarm’s service to farmers. WeFarm’s network operates both online and over SMS, ensuring maximum reach for offline communities.


    The partnership which utilises latest mobile and machine learning technology to support farmer innovation will be targeting dairy farmers in Nakuru County, will utilize WeFarm’s technology to enable farmers to access and exchange timely and tailored information relating to farming challenges, best practices and crop and livestock diversification.


    Mary Wanyutu, a livestock farmer and Heifer project participant from Nakuru, welcomed the innovation as a way of empowering farmers. “It is great because when I ask a question, the responses from other farmers on the network are fast and very informative,” said Ms Wanyutu.

     

    READ ALSO: Nakuru hay farmer commended by UK

    READ ALSO: Nakuru farmer increases milk production by letting cows watch TV

    READ ALSO: Nakuru’s smallholder farmer doubles yields growing crops organically


    The farmers working with Heifer will be joining over 240,000 other farmers around the world who are already sharing vital information on WeFarm. The partnership will further enable Heifer to scale the impact and reach of their training and capability-building programs by expanding peer-to-peer support and providing regular SMS communication and insights into on the ground activities and key issues facing farmers.


    Said Kenny Ewan, CEO of WeFarm, “This partnership with Heifer is very important to WeFarm. Our mutual belief in the value of peer-to-peer knowledge and shared commitment to creating sustainable initiatives for farmers through the latest technologies – are sure to produce great results. We look forward to working with the entire Heifer Kenya team”.


    “Like anyone in business, the farmers Heifer works with need accurate, timely information that empowers them to make smart decisions about prices, markets, investments and other key factors that determine their prosperity,” said George Odhiambo, country director for Heifer in Kenya. “WeFarm provides access to this vital information and also connects the farmers to a global community that shares advice and other guidance that will help them thrive.”

     

    Write comment (0 Comments)

    Page 7 of 8

    Editor's Pick

    Weekly weather updates

     

    Sign Up

    Sign up to receive our newsletter
    FarmBiz Africa © 2018

    Please publish modules in offcanvas position.